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Martial Arts
Martial Arts Styles and Related Rules...


Introduction
  
...for Advanced Dungeons & Dragons(tm) in MyWorld.
...for Multiverser.
In the Oriental Adventures campaign, it is possible for a character to learn particularly effective combat forms.  Although many of these use weapons (frequently with devastating results), it is the weaponless aspect of most styles, the ability to do real and often fatal damage with hands and feet, which most clearly characterizes martial arts within the game.  It has been deemed not feasible to incorporate all the martial arts styles and rules in the character creation document, even though most oriental characters will begin with a style, partially because of the volume of material necessary for this, and partially because within the rules it is possible at any time to create a new style for a new character.  Thus, this document will be expanded with any new martial arts style created, and will include the rules for creating a new style as well as all the styles currently recognized by the game system. Under the bod bias rules, it is possible for a character to learn particularly effective combat forms.  Although many of these use weapons (frequently with devastating results), it is the weaponless aspect of most styles, the ability to do significant and often fatal damage with body parts, which most clearly characterizes martial arts within the game.  This section does not incorporate all the martial arts styles and rules possible in the game, because within the rules it is possible at any time to create a new style or a new maneuver.  After all, in Multiverser there is no fiction:  all martial arts styles, real and imagined, are part of the game.
The player should consider existing styles carefully before deciding to create a new style.  Many of these styles are very potent, and any new style designed contains many randomly determined elements.  The player cannot just pick any design he pleases, but is limited to selecting the basic design for the style, and using the dice to determine the details. The referee should consider existing styles before creating a new style.  Many of these styles are very potent.  The player should not be allowed to pick any design he pleases, but is limited to styles which the referee makes available through non-player characters, except where a player enters the game with training in a martial arts style or uses the skill learning rules to invent his own style.
Within these rules the player will find first such rules as have been developed concerning the specific use and learning of martial arts in various circumstances, followed by the rules for the creation of a style (which follows the book with minimal modification), then a list of available styles sorted by form and method, and an alphabetic listing of styles with full descriptions.  Finally there are various tables indicating which maneuvers and which weapons are used in which styles. Within this section the referee will find rules concerning the specific use and learning of martial arts in various circumstances, followed by the suggestions for the incorporation of a player style, then a list of suggested styles sorted by type of style and basic attack form, and an alphabetic listing of those styles with full descriptions.  Finally there are various tables indicating which maneuvers and which weapons are taught in which styles.
Each description includes the style name and a brief description, followed by form, method, armor class adjustment, attack multiplier, base damage, body part, available weapons, and special maneuvers.  This is followed by an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the style complete with what maneuvers are or might be known with each title earned.  Titles are used under the MyWorld rules to define the degree of mastery within the style; they are earned according to the percent of the total available maneuvers within the style the character has learned. Each description includes the style name and a brief description, followed by attack multiplier, sit-mods and damage mods, body part used for basic attacks, weapons taught, and maneuvers within the style.  This is followed by an analysis of the style maneuvers known with each title earned.  Titles are used to define the degree of mastery within the style; they are earned according to the number of related skills learned and the skill ability level in each.

If in the course of examining this material, you want to know more about AD&D, there are at least hundreds of sites on the web which may help; I'll just recommend my own two:

M. J. Young's Dungeons & Dragons Materials as source material for many campaigns and situations;
and all you need to create a character, Character Creation for Advanced Dungeons & Dragons First Edition.
And if in the course of examining this material you want to know more about Multiverser, check it out at:
The Multiverser Information Center.

Index:  The introductory page to the material.


Introduction:  Gives an overview of the contents of the web site.

Creating a Martial Arts Style:  Describes the way styles are designed.

Attacks per Round/Attack Multipliers:  How frequently the martial artist may attack.

Learning Martial Arts:  Rules and training techniques.

Martial Arts Titles:  A MyWorld variant and Multiverser concept substituting for "belts".

Use of Multiple Styles:  How to change between styles within the game.

AC for Special Maneuvers/Modifiers for Special Maneuver Attacks:  Clarification of how to use special attacks.

Special Maneuvers Summary:  The available maneuvers are listed with all information.

Stun and Incapacitate:  AD&D rules incorporate this into standard attacks; for Multiverser, this would be a separate skill.

Translating a Player Style:  Multiverser allows a player to bring his actual martial arts skills into the game through these rules.

The Style Collection:  Our imaginary styles are offered for your use.


Other Links of Interest:  A collection of sites related to this material in one way or another.